loudoun

Local Singer and Songwriter Celebrates Her Return to Music 

Written by Will Thompson
Photos by Callie Broaddus 

“Performing, especially when you’re performing your own music, is getting to connect with people and getting to feel the difference that  [your music] makes in another person,” says Juliet Lloyd, singer-songwriter and frequent Middleburg-area performer, while discussing her jam-packed schedule of local shows.

Lloyd has been busy propelling the resurgence of her music career after finding initial success as a celebrated independent artist in the mid and late 2000’s. This July she released a new album titled “High Road.” She was recently named the winner of the 2022 Bernard/Ebb Songwriting Competition which recognizes the best songwriting talent in the Capital region, and her live performance schedule shows no signs of slowing down with upcoming gigs across Hunt Country including Lost Barrel Brewing and 50 West Vineyards.

At her performances, Lloyd’s spot-on cover tracks get the crowd moving while her original tracks afford audiences the opportunity to connect with her through heartfelt melodies and lyrics plucked from relatable moments in her own life. 

“High Road,” the title track on Lloyd’s new album, is a wistful pondering of why doing the right thing can sometimes feel so wrong. Delivered by Lloyd’s considerable vocal power over a melancholic piano and guitar accompaniment, “High Road” leaves listeners with a reflective mix of empowerment and regret. The track effortlessly weaves in drums and a rousing electric guitar solo to build to a crescendo of self-vindication that candidly laments the lost opportunity to indulge in conflict. “Over You” lightens the mood with a fun, melodic breakup song that’s a flippant attempt at assuring the world of being over a partner while being anything but. And from Llyod’s previous full-length album, “Come Tomorrow”is a sincere, hopeful song that highlights  the eventuality of gaining optimism through pain. It’s like a warm hug from a friend on a bad day. 

It was “Come Tomorrow,” from Lloyd’s 2007 album, “Leave the Light On,” that led the Boston Globe to proclaim that Lloyd was on “on the cusp of stardom” after the song was featured on television shows including “The Real World” and “The Hills” in addition to being added into rotation at more than 175 radio stations across the country. 

Juliet Lloyd, guitarist Steve Quintilian (left), and percussionist Oscar Mulford (right).

Lloyds success can be attributed to her lifelong passion for singing and performing. “I learned by singing along with Mariah Carey in my basement every day after school,” laughs Lloyd, recalling her earliest days as a self-taught singer. Though Lloyd went on to work through an undergraduate degree in economics, she kept singing as a hobby. Her first professional foray into music came after college when she resolutely set out to be a singer-songwriter. “Thankfully when I sat down to actually try to write, my first songs weren’t the worst in the world,” Lloyd jokes. As she ventured deeper into music and songwriting, Lloyd began to make her mark as an independent artist with original albums and songs such as “Leave the Light On.”

Even with modest musical success, Lloyd still  had the desire to exercise her degree in economics and find success in a corporate ecosystem. Lloyd took a step back from music professionally just over a decade ago to begin a career in communications consulting. But she never lost her love for music, her flair for songwriting, or her passion for performing.

Things changed for Lloyd at the outset of the COVID-19 pandemic. The difficult experience of the pandemic and lockdowns reawakened her drive to put emotions into words and melodies. As venues slowly reopened, Lloyd began to perform and write again, eventually making the decision to concentrate on music full-time. “Even though it’s the second time around, it feels like a huge leap of faith,” says Lloyd, recounting this decision.

Left: Juliet Lloyd jams out on the keyboard during a recent performance at Farm Brew LIVE in Manassas. Middle: Lloyd and the band play covers, old favorites, and new originals. Right: Lloyd’s merchandise.

That leap of faith has resulted in numerous live shows andthe release of “High Road,” her first original content after a more than ten-year hiatus from songwriting. The album is unique for Llyod because of its distinct country music influence, stylistic growth that she credits to performing in the Middleburg area, taking requests for country cover songs, and becoming part of the community. “Because I perform so consistently in Loudoun County, I recognize a lot of people now. Every time I play, a few more people have come back to see [me] again. I’ve gotten to know so many people in the community, and they’ve been such amazing supporters of my music,” Lloyd says. 

As her reputation expands and her audiences grow, belief in the power of music will always be at the heart of what Lloyd does. “My favorite performances, whether there’s a lot of people or there’s two people, are when somebody says ‘Oh my gosh, that song really speaks to me,’ or ‘I went through something similar.’” ML

More information about Juliet Lloyd along with samples of her music and performance schedule can be found at julietlloyd.com.

This article first appeared in the August 2022 Issue

Changing of the Guard:
Morison and Price Pass the Gavel Again

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE         Contact: Alexander Nance, 540-687-6681
Price and Morison celebrate a successful event at historic Pelham as the sun sets over the Blue Ridge Mountains. Courtesy of VPHA.

Middleburg, Virginia, August 22nd, 2022 – The Virginia Piedmont Heritage Area Association (VPHA) is pleased to announce that its Board of Directors has elected Stephen C. Price to become the new Chair after C. Dulany Morison’s Director term limit finishes in August. Morison has served as Chair for three years, guiding the organization through a series of unprecedented challenges and expanding its footprint as a principal force in preservation. “It has been a distinct honor to serve the Heritage Area and although there have been a few long nights, it has been an incredibly rewarding experience and I could not be more grateful to have worked alongside such a dedicated staff and Board of Directors,” said Morison, who has agreed to continue leading the Preservation Committee in his capacity as Chair Emeritus with Ashton Cole.

Morison worked with the Bondi family to establish the “Bondi Family Land Conservation and Battlefield Preservation Fund,” which has contributed to the protection of several historic properties in the Unison Battlefield Study Area. He has been a driving force in the battle to protect Aldie from inappropriate development which recently celebrated a great victory at the Aldie Assemblage. He oversaw the republishing of Profiting Through Preservation, which details the economic benefit for open space conservation, agriculture, heritage tourism, and historic structure preservation. Last year the organization celebrated its postponed 25th Anniversary and recorded its most successful fundraising year to date.

Price has a long history with the organization and served as Chair from 2018-2019.  Morison remarked, “Steve has been devoted to our mission since he joined the Board in 2010 and we were thrilled when he agreed to step back in. He has been a pillar of leadership and we could not be in more capable hands.” Price has been instrumental in developing new VPHA programs and directed the successful “Year of John Marshall,” which brought guests to Llangollen, Oak Hill, The Hollow, and the John Marshall House in Richmond to study the Chief Justice.  

In addition to being a partner in the Northern Virginia law firm of McCandlish & Lillard, Price holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Virginia Military Institute, a law degree from the University of Virginia, and a master’s degree from the University of Cambridge (Queens’ College). He served as president of the George Marshall International Center at Dodona Manor during the restoration of the General’s home, and he was a member of the Loudoun County Sesquicentennial Committee and Commissioner in Chancery for the Loudoun County Circuit Court. He also serves as general counsel for the Land Trust of Virginia.

VPHA has significantly increased their focus on special events and following up on their recent programs on Patsy Cline and F. Scott Fitzgerald, Price aims to continue featuring Heritage Area artists. He also has plans to focus on the history of our endangered historic villages, and programs are underway for Paris, Lucketts, and Browntown. Looking ahead to 2024, preparations have already begun to recognize the 200-year Anniversary of the Marquis de Lafayette’s reunion tour through the United States, which will include a series of events highlighting the sites he visited in the Heritage Area.  

The organization will continue its focus on preservation advocacy and student education. Threats to the Heritage Area landscape are on the rise, and VPHA remains committed to working diligently with local government and preservation partners to protect the integrity of our extraordinary countryside. VPHA’s classroom programs, which have educated more than 55,000 students, resumed this spring and they hope to reach 75,000 students by 2025. Price is optimistic for the future and looks forward to building VPHA membership across the Heritage Area through a variety of offerings that connect citizens with our vast historic resources.  

The mission of the Virginia Piedmont Heritage Area Association is preservation through education — to educate about the history of, and advocate for, the preservation of the extraordinary historic landscape, culture, and scenery in the Northern Virginia Piedmont for future generations to enjoy.

For more information, visit www.piedmontheritage.org

Foxcroft School Earns Prestigious VAIS Accreditation

MIDDLEBURG, VA — Foxcroft School, an independent college-preparatory boarding and day school for girls in grades 9-12 and post-graduate in Middleburg, VA, has earned full reaccreditation from the Virginia Association of Independent Schools (VAIS). Founded in 1973, VAIS is the leader in advancing and advocating for independent school education in Virginia. The VAIS accreditation program is one of the select few recognized at the international level through the International Council Advancing Independent School Accreditation (ICAISA). VAIS also is recognized and approved by the Virginia Board of Education through the Virginia Council for Private Education (VCPE).

Foxcroft received the highest report a school can receive in addition to meeting or exceeding all standards for accreditation. A visiting team comprised of the VAIS Director of Accreditation and administrators and faculty from five VAIS member schools also commended Foxcroft in several key areas, including Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging (DEIB); Curriculum and Pedagogy; Wellness; and Financial Well-Being.

“Parents can be sure that when choosing a VAIS-accredited school for their children, the school has been through an intense period of self-reflection and evaluation, which strengthens the entire institution,” said Betsy Hunroe, Executive Director of VAIS.

The voluntary accreditation process is a rigorous undertaking involving a comprehensive self-study, including input from all school constituents. A team of peer evaluators from VAIS member schools spends several days on campus reviewing the self-study report, documentation, and curriculum; meeting with administrators, trustees, students, parents, and teachers; and observing campus life. The team concludes the in-depth visit with a detailed written assessment. The finalized report is then submitted for accreditation approval by the VAIS Board of Directors.

“As a School community, we have much to celebrate and the success of this process engenders a sense of pride,” shared Head of School Cathy McGehee. “At the same time, this important procedure encourages us to keep working to make sure Foxcroft stays strong for the future.”

To learn more about Foxcroft School, visit www.foxcroft.org. To learn more about VAIS accreditation, visit vais.org.

Photo Courtesy of Foxcroft School.

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About Foxcroft School Founded in 1914, Foxcroft School is a college-preparatory boarding and day school for girls in grades 9-12 and PG with a mission of helping every girl explore her unique voice and develop the skills, confidence, and courage to share it with the world. Foxcroft offers 72-76 courses, including 16+ AP classes and 5+ post-AP offerings, and a STEM program that inspires girls to pursue studies in fields where women are underrepresented. Foxcroft fields athletic teams in 11 sports and has a nationally known riding program. For more information about the School, please explore our website at www.foxcroft.org or call 540.687.5555.

Dr. Tanya Hyatt Named Assistant Head of School at Foxcroft School

Dr. Tanya Hyatt, Assistant Head of School for Foxcroft School. Photo Courtesy of Foxcroft School.

MIDDLEBURG, VA — Dr. Tanya Hyatt has been named Assistant Head of School at Foxcroft School, effective July 1, 2022. Dr. Hyatt, who has a wealth of boarding school administrative and teaching experience, comes to Foxcroft from Indian Springs School outside of Birmingham, AL, a day and boarding school for grades 8-12, where she was Dean of Faculty. 

“I am thrilled to be at Foxcroft,” shared Dr. Hyatt. “As a scientist, I have always worked to increase girls’ engagement in STEM classes and careers and am excited to be at a school committed to empowering young women to reach their full potential and gain confidence in their abilities. The way Foxcroft nurtures every girl to find her passion(s), her voice, and her authentic self are what drew me here, and I look forward to working with each student to find the right learning path for them.”

As Dean of Faculty at Indian Springs, Dr. Hyatt led all aspects of hiring, mentoring new faculty, and planning faculty meetings and professional development, among other responsibilities. Under her leadership, Indian Springs revised the hiring process to work to eliminate bias and increase faculty of color. She also worked to implement a new annual faculty evaluation using Folio Collaborative. Prior to serving as Dean of Faculty, she was the School’s Dean of Academics, working to strengthen course offerings, improve the academic schedule, integrate study skills into the curriculum, and increase classroom technology use. The faculty, administrators, and Board of Trustees at Indian Springs held her in such esteem that she was appointed Acting Head of School for four months in 2019 when the Head left unexpectedly before the end of the academic year. 

“While Dr. Hyatt is uniquely qualified for the Assistant Head of School position,” confirmed Foxcroft Head of School Cathy McGehee, “it was her warm spirit, calm presence, listening skills, and philosophy of educating the whole child that stood out during her meetings with our faculty, administrators, parents, and students. She impressed the search committee with her ‘all-in’ commitment to teaching and living at a boarding school.”

Dr. Hyatt earned a Bachelor of Science in Biology from the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, and a Ph.D. in Nutrition Science from the University of Alabama, Birmingham. She has published research on nutrition, some specifically related to women, and has also earned her paramedic license and national certification. While at Indian Springs, Dr. Hyatt held several positions, including Science Department Chair, Dorm Faculty, Administrator on Duty, and faculty liaison to the judiciary committee of the Student Government. She also taught a range of STEM courses, including AP Biology and AP Environmental Science, molecular genetics, research methods, human anatomy, and nutrition.  

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About Foxcroft School

Founded in 1914, Foxcroft School is a college-preparatory boarding and day school for girls in grades 9-12 and PG with a mission of helping every girl explore her unique voice and develop the skills, confidence, and courage to share it with the world. Foxcroft offers 72-76 courses, including 16+ AP classes and 5+ post-AP offerings, and a STEM program that inspires girls to pursue studies in fields where women are underrepresented. Foxcroft fields athletic teams in 11 sports and has a nationally known riding program. For more information about the School, please explore our website at www.foxcroft.org or call 540.687.5555.

A Decade Afield: Celebrating 10 Years of NSLM’s Museum

Written by Dulcy B. Hooper 

For visitors of Middleburg’s National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM), the past 10 years have offered a delightful series of memorable exhibitions.

When it opened its doors to the public in 2011, the museum’s inaugural exhibition was entitled Afield in America: 400 Years of Animal & Sporting Art. It featured over 100 works, all of which were on loan from major institutions and private collections from across the country. 

Henri DeLattre (French, 1801–1876) The Race Between Mac and Zachary Taylor at Hunting Park Course, Philadelphia, July 18, 1849, 1850, oil on canvas, 27 3/4 x 43 3/4 inches, Gift of Mr. and Mrs. F. Turner Reuter, Jr. and Anonymous, 2021. Courtesy of the National Sporting Library & Museum.

Built in 1804, the historic house which would become the museum was bequeathed to the National Sporting Library (NSL) by George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. It was then renovated and expanded in the two years prior to the museum’s opening with the addition of 10 small-to-medium galleries, two hall galleries, and an extended section boasting two large galleries. All the artworks installed in the main entry space and in the second-floor galleries were acquired through donations and bequests subsequent to the museum’s opening. According to Claudia Pfeiffer, the NSLM’s deputy director and George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. curator, when the permanent collection was initially installed in 2012, the museumwas only able to fill a quarter of the galleries.

At the time, initial plans for the museum focused on developing two loan exhibitions per year for the two large galleries and featuring the permanent collection in Vine Hill’s historic wing. “Those traveling exhibitions allowed a buffer of time for us to research, develop, and curate the museum’s own topics,” Pfeiffer says.

A Decade Afield features over 120 18th- to 20th-century American, British, and Continental artworks and pays tribute to the 10-year growth of the museum’s permanent collection. It is divided into 10 sections representing the “broadening scope and depth of NSLM’s holdings.” Some of the museum’s earliest pieces can be found in the Federal-style galleries in the Vine Hill mansion wing.

Left: Gallery wall. Courtesy of the National Sporting Library & Museum. Middle: Herbert Haseltine (American, 1877–1962) Portuguese Rejoneadores, a pair, modeled 1921, gilded bronze, 12 3/4 x 11 1/4 x 4 3/4 inches, Gift of the Estate of Milton Ritzenberg, 2018. Courtesy of the National Sporting Library & Museum. Right: The NSLM on a beautiful summer’s day. Photo by Kaitlin Hill.

“It was a great opportunity to thematically organize the NSLM’s art collection and showcase the works with bold color choices for the walls,” Pfeiffer emphasizes. “The goal was to create an impactful visual experience for first-time and returning visitors alike and to give an overview of how the collection came to be and grew to what it is today.” The museum was closed for the month of May in preparation for the exhibition.

Today, the NSLM’s collection includes 1,445 objects encompassing a wide range of mediums including paintings, sculptures, works on paper, trophies, weathervanes, and dog collars.

Left: John Frederick Herring, Sr. (English, 1795–1865) Going to the Fair, 1841, oil on canvas, 57 1/2 x 95 inches, Gift of Manuel H. and Mary Johnson, 2021. Right: Alfred Duke (British, 1863–1905) Game and Gun Dogs, late 19th/early 20th century, oil on canvas, 24 x 20 1/8 inches, Gift of Mrs. Jacqueline B. Mars, 2022. Courtesy of the National Sporting Library & Museum.

The beginning section of the exhibit, entitled “The Start,” creates an “aesthetic reminiscent of a country house, its inhabitants, and the country way of life,” Pfeiffer explains. Many of the best pieces in this section are portraits of key figures instrumental in expanding the library. The next section, “Setting the Course,” features two galleries dedicated to Felicia Warburg Rogan and honors her donation of 15 important British sporting art paintings. According to Pfeiffer, those works “set the bar for the NSLM’s standards moving forward and brought in iconic paintings by John Emms and Alfred James Munnings.”

The section “Mixed Bag” is an eclectic assortment of sporting works including a 41-inch English sterling silver model of a coach, NSLM’s earliest artwork, “Horse in a Landscape” by Abraham von Calraet, and paintings by Franklin Brooke Voss.  

The remainder of the exhibition highlights the subsequent growth of the collection with such themes as “Spurring On,” “On Point,” “Casting the Line,” “Tally Ho!,” “The Menagerie,” “A Record Place,” and “Winners Circle.”  

As for their next 10 years?  “We look forward to what the future holds,” Pfeiffer says.

A Decade Afield will be on view through September 18, 2022. ML

This article first appeared in the July 2022 Issue.

NVTRP Announces Rebrand, Changes Name to Cloverleaf Equine Center 

Northern Virginia Therapeutic Riding Program unveiled a new name and logo as part of rebrand initiative

Contact:
Shelby Morrison
Grants and Communications Manager
Equine Specialist in Mental Health and Learning (ESMHL)

Photos by Tony Gibson

Clifton, VA – July 11, 2022 – The Northern Virginia Therapeutic Riding Program, a leading provider of equine-assisted services to children and adults with disabilities, youth from marginalized communities, recovering military personnel, and others in need, has completed an extensive rebrand effort in response to organizational growth and future expansion. At the heart of the rebrand is a change of the program name to Cloverleaf Equine Center – representing services offered extend beyond the Northern Virginia area – and an update to the center’s logo. 

Founded in 1980, the organization began as a small operation in Clifton, Virginia with a couple borrowed horses and a handful of clients and volunteers. Today, Cloverleaf Equine Center serves over 100 weekly clients from the DC Metro area with the help of more than 250 active volunteers and a herd of 18 horses on a 17-acre farm in Fairfax County. In addition to therapeutic riding, Cloverleaf’s services include physical therapy incorporating horses, equine-assisted learning and psychotherapy incorporating horses.

“This is a major milestone for the organization. We have grown so much in the last 20 years and are excited that our brand now reflects all we do,” said Kelsey Gallagher, executive director. “We are looking forward to the unlimited potential equine-assisted services brings to our clients and our community now and for many years to come.” 

A cloverleaf symbol already had great significance to the organization: The Cloverleaf name is a nod to the center’s early beginnings as the Fairfax County 4-H Therapeutic Riding Program. The property is also located in an area that is called Cloverleaf Farm Estates, honoring the organization’s historical ties to the town of Clifton. Each leaf of a clover represents the different programs offered and the populations served through equine-assisted services. 

In addition to the name and logo change, a new website – cloverleafequinecenter.org – will launch later this summer.

About Cloverleaf: Originally chartered in 1980, Cloverleaf Equine Center is a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization dedicated to providing equine-assisted services to children and adults with disabilities, youth from marginalized communities, military service personnel and their families in an inclusive, community setting. Learning to ride and care for a horse not only improves the physical health of the rider but also generates a critically important sense of accomplishment. Clients participating in Cloverleaf programs represent a range of disabilities including attention deficit disorder, autism, cerebral palsy, developmental disabilities, vision and hearing impairments, and genetic syndromes. Cloverleaf is a Premier Center accredited by the Professional Association of Therapeutic Horsemanship International (PATH Intl), and a member center of the Therapeutic Riding Association of Virginia (TRAV). Cloverleaf Equine Center is located in Clifton, VA. 

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Cloverleaf Equine Center

703-764-0269

NOVA PARKS ACQUIRES 128 ACRES IN LOUDOUN COUNTY ON POTOMAC

Kuhn Family Land Donation Makes New Park Possible

Fairfax, Virginia (June 28, 2022) – NOVA Parks has acquired a 128-acre riverfront property in Loudoun County. A donation by philanthropists Chuck & Stacy Kuhn of half the value of the land ($900,ooo) and an equal grant from the Federal Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) made this addition to the parks agency possible. The LWCF is a federal program which provides 50 percent matching funds to state agencies and localities for the acquisition and development of outdoor recreation resources. 

“Acquiring this new land overlooking the Potomac River is right in line with NOVA Parks’ 2023-2027 Strategic Plan, which places a high value on protecting natural resources and our shared environment,” said NOVA Parks Chair Cate Magennis Wyatt. “NOVA Parks’ plans to plant trees and restore habitat will greatly increase the ecological value of the land and protect the Potomac River.”

This morning, Chuck & Stacy Kuhn, owners of JK Land Holdings,  JK Moving Services, and CapRelo, NOVA Parks Chair Cate Magennis Wyatt, Loudoun County Board of Supervisors Chair Phyllis Randall, Supervisor Kristen Umstattd, and other community leaders signed the deed at the property, which will become Springdale Regional Park. 

“Creating this new park helps fulfill our goals of having more green and open space and providing Loudoun citizens with opportunities to enjoy Loudoun’s beauty” said Board of Supervisors Chair Phyllis Randall. “We’re grateful to NOVA Parks and Chuck & Stacy Kuhn for their role as stewards of Loudoun County’s rich environmental, historic, and recreational resources.”

Over the past decade, the Kuhns have conserved more than 22,000 acres of land—land greater than the size of Manhattan—ensuring vulnerable vistas and habitats are preserved and protected for future generations. The Kuhns have also won numerous awards, including being recognized by the Washington Business Journal as a Top Corporate Philanthropist and the Old Dominion Land Conservancy for their conservation efforts. In addition to the NOVA Parks donation, they have protected multiple area landmarks and natural habitats by buying and conserving:

·        500-acre Wolver Hill Farm in Middleburg

·        Historic White’s Ferry in Maryland

·        135-acre Westpark golf course in Leesburg that is being transformed into a park

·        JK Black Oak Wildlife Sanctuary, 87 acres in Loudoun with rare wetlands, native plants, and wildlife 

·        150-acres in Purcellville used to start the JK Community Farm, a charitable effort that alleviates hunger by growing chemical free crops and livestock and donating them to local foodbanks

·        Historic and now fully renovated Middleburg Training Center 

·        Several thousand acres near Loudoun’s historic villages

·        Two contiguous parcels of land in Saint Louis, Virginia, one of county’s first African American townships, into conservation easement to protect the 42 acres from development

The Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation deemed the property eligible for this federal grant because it met the criteria of the Virginia Outdoors Plan (VOP) goals for land conservation. The VOP aims to protect undeveloped land and waterways that provide essential benefits to society, such as clean air, clean water, food, fiber, open space for recreation, and a sense of place. The VOP prioritizes land along major rivers, like the Potomac.

The purchase saves the property from residential development, as it was once destined to become a subdivision for 16 single family residential lots. Instead, with the adjacent land already owned by NOVA Parks, the new park will comprise 278 acres and ¾ of a mile of Potomac River front. Springdale Regional Park will be able to enhance the natural habitat and to offer future families the chance to visit the park, experience nature, and learn about its rich history. The property was once an important area for Native Americans, who fished along the nearby Heater’s Island. 

The first pillar of NOVA Parks’ soon-to-be-finalized 2023-2027 Strategic Plan is protecting the environment. This includes actively acquiring and managing many of the largest intact natural areas in the region. NOVA Parks’ efforts to restore natural resources like riparian buffers—which protect waterways—and to plant trees—which remove ozone-depleting carbon from the air, address the root causes of climate change and help our region be more climate resilient.

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About NOVA Parks

Founded in 1959 as a conservation organization, NOVA Parks (Northern Virginia Regional Park Authority) is the only regional park authority in Virginia. It represents three Northern Virginia counties and three cities—Arlington County, Fairfax County, Loudoun County, the City of Alexandria, the City of Falls Church, and the City of Fairfax. The regional agency manages 34 parks with 12,335 acres of parkland, including waterparks, golf courses, campsites, historic sites, event venues, boat launches, annual holiday light shows, and a high adventure ropes course.

About JK Land Holdings

JK Land Holdings, LLC (JKLH) —owned by Chuck & Stacy Kuhn—seeks land acquisitions that can be sold, leased, developed, placed into conservation easement, or utilized by sister companies JK Moving Services and CapRelo, a global employee relocation and assignment management firm serving private and public sector clients. JKLH was founded in 2016, and has reinvested monies gained from land acquisition into protecting properties and tracts of land from future development.

What’s Old is New Again at Another Blue Moon

Written by Shayda Windle
Photos by Callie Broaddus 

If Hunt Country is anything, it most certainly is not a place lacking in things to do or see. In addition to pastoral views of the Blue Ridge and Bull Run Mountains, famed foxhunts, and steeplechase races, there is also a vibrant shopping district in the town of Middleburg that keeps visitors coming back for more. With its tree-lined brick sidewalks and 18th-century buildings, historic Middleburg has rows of lively restaurants and boutiques that attract people from all over. This intriguing mix of old and new can be found at Another Blue Moon, a luxury consignment shop in the heart of town. The unique secondhand store offers an assortment of antique and vintage furniture, decorative accessories, collectibles, and home goods.

What started out as a pop-up founded by six friends in 2018 has evolved into the brick-and-mortar retail store you see today on Washington Street. The store is co-owned by longtime friends Kerry Dale and Jennifer Andrews. As people began cleaning out their homes and looking to recycle possessions during the pandemic, Dale and Andrews saw an opportunity to continue the venture. At Another Blue Moon, you’ll find beautiful furniture, vintage mirrors, lamps, tables, rugs, tea sets, and so much more. What makes this boutique so special is that most items come from local homes and friends of the owners. So, when you buy a piece from Another Blue Moon, you’re not only supporting the local economy — you’re also giving back to the community of contributors who have decided to consign their goods here. You’re buying something special from another person’s sanctuary and continuing that treasure’s story.

“We take things that we know customers are looking for and are complementary to our design style and inventory.”

-Dale

Dale says, “Because of our community and the nature of it, and as the real estate market has exploded, our business has grown too. We added space this year and now have barn space in the basement of the Middleburg Professional Center.” During the pandemic, Dale adds, “Instagram saved us. We would take photos and post them to social media. People would claim their goods online then come pick them up in-store.” Andrews chimes in, “Instagram not only provides an outlet for home shopping and dreaming, but continues to offer comic relief even today. What else could make you laugh about a needlepoint pillow, a Herend cat, or a shapely French chest? We learn something every day about the business and there’s always a fresh challenge around the corner.”

Left: A stack of books perfect for a home office. Center: Dale surrounded by the shop’s many treasures. Righ: Hunt Country accents are in no short supply.

“Many times, people will send me twenty pictures of what they want to consign, but we must curate what we take,” Dale explains. “We take things that we know customers are looking for and are complementary to our design style and inventory. We carry anything from antiques to contemporary to transitional and more traditional goods.” Another Blue Moon also considers whether items are on-trend, the condition they are in, and seasonality as they curate their collection. They will generally hold items for about 90 days, but Dale says they try very hard to sell with a quicker turnaround.

“If you don’t love what you do, then why do it?”

-Andrews 

It’s clear how much these two women enjoy the process of building a business together, and their passion for “finding a new life for something that still has life in it” is even more inspiring. But perhaps Andrews puts it best. She says with a laugh, “I feel like I’m in an episode of the Beverly Hillbillies, driving through Loudoun with a van full of old furniture to drop off at a barn. If you don’t love what you do, then why do it?” ML

Another Blue Moon is open Thursday, Friday, and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and by appointment. Be sure to stop by the basement area of the Middleburg Professional Center on 119 The Plains Road for more from Another Blue Moon. You can also check them out on Instagram @anotherbluemoon to see what’s available now. New inventory is added regularly.

This article first appeared in the June 2022 Issue.

J&L Interiors, LLC Select Kenny Bills as 2022 Pathways of Design Scholarship Winner

 $5000 Scholarship Awarded to Kenny Bills to Help Fund His Creative Arts Study at VCU Arts 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Matt Kraycinovich 
Email: matt @kraycopr.com 

 LEESBURG, VA – June 21, 2022 –- Award-winning interior designers and twin sisters Julie Hoffmann and Lori DuVal of J&L Interiors announced today Loudoun Valley High School student Kenny Bills as the first recipient of the J&L Interiors “Pathways of Design” Scholarship. 

“We are delighted to award the 2022 J&L Interiors Pathways of Design Scholar to Kenny Bills, a graduating high school senior at Loudoun Valley High School who will attend VCU Arts this Fall,” stated Julie Hoffmann, principal and co-founder of J&L Interiors. She continued, “We created this scholarship to help a deserving and promising student in his or her studies and we are so excited for Kenny and his future in the creative arts.” 

“Kenny is a talented arts student with a strong academic record and has contributed to the community as an Eagle Scout and through his volunteer work with Group Mission Trips and Workcamps, a weeklong summer retreat where Kenny helped to renovate and repair homes,” said Lori DuVal, principal and co-founder of J&L Interiors. 

Hoffmann and DuVal created the J&L Interiors Pathways of Design Scholarship which totals $5,000 to celebrate J&L Interiors’ 25th business anniversary. The scholarship helps to fund expenses for higher education learning to include trade schools and universities with a preferred interest in a study abroad immersive experience. It will allow the student to explore, discover and be inspired by the city’s arts, culture, history, and more which – in turn – will nurture, cultivate and encourage the student in his or her own individual pathway toward a successful and rewarding career in the creative arts. 

WHO: Julie Hoffmann & Lori DuVal of J&L Interiors and Loudoun Valley High School Student Kenny Bills 

WHAT: Announced Loudoun Valley High School Student Kenny Bills as First Recipient of J&L Interiors Pathways of Design Scholarship totaling $5000 

WHEN: June 21, 2022 

WHERE: Leesburg & Loudoun County, Virginia 

Photo by Tina Krohn

ABOUT J&L INTERIORS, LLC 

J&L Interiors, LLC is an award-winning, full-scale interior design firm located 40 miles west of Washington, D.C. in historic Leesburg, Virginia with clients from Northern Virginia, Maryland, DC and beyond. Founded in 1997 by twin sisters Julie Hoffmann and Lori DuVal, the J&L Interiors design team provides both residential and commercial design services that reflect a deep passion for design and for creating truly unique interiors. For more information, visit www.jandlinteriors.net. 

A National Campaign and Local Effort for Greener Horseshows 

Written by Kaitlin Hill 

More than historic, the site of the Upperville Colt & Horse show is undeniably green. The sloping lawns, towering hundred-plus year-old trees, and the familiar evergreen paint on nearly every structure all contribute to a feeling of being one with nature upon entering the gates of the showground. And in recent years, there have been efforts to make Upperville even greener by operating the show with environmental impact in mind, led by a national campaign called Green is the New Blue and aided by local efforts supporting the cause. 

Founded by amateur equestrian Stephanie Riggio Bulger, Green is the New Blue (GNB) partners with horse shows across the country to reduce the impact of equestrian events can on the planet. Emily Cleland of GNB shares, “With year-round horse show circuits available to us, we are such a transient population. And in the effort to get from show to show, we just don’t realize the amount of waste we produce, especially in the form of plastics: supplement tubs, shavings bags, twine, water bottles… just for one horse and rider, it really adds up.” 

As the oldest horse show in the nation, it seems appropriate that Upperville was also Green is the New Blue’s original partner. Cleland says, “Upperville was actually our very first horse show partner!” She adds, “Its management team has made such a commitment to the future with their forward-thinking approaches to sustainability.” 

Caitlin Lane, executive director of Upperville Horse Shows, LLC notes, “We have been working with Green is the New Blue for a few years to develop a sustainability program. We’ve been brainstorming with them on how to expand the program and get more people involved, more sponsors.” 

For this year’s show, the team at UCHS and GNB connected with Maria Eldredge and Anne McIntosh of Middleburg Real Estate and Atoka Properties. Lane shares, “In talking with Middleburg Real Estate, we put forward the idea that we wanted to add these hydration stations and it would be something new this year.” 

Coincidentally, Eldredge explains, “Middleburg Real Estate had just come up with a new program where, as agents, if we wanted to sponsor something we could, and we’re trying to do more locally.” A single-use to reusable convert herself, Eldredge jumped the idea of sponsoring the hydration stations and partnered with McIntosh and Middleburg Real Estate to cover the $10,000 project. She says, “Instead of selling thousands of [single-use] plastic bottles, there will be tents set up with bamboo cups. You can refill your water bottle and there will be bigger jugs of water.” 

This latest initiative is one of many that Upperville has adopted to reduce its environmental impact. Lane says, “We are doing wider facility recycling. We’ve been able to recycle the shavings bags which is a big source of plastic for us. We are trying to work on where the manure goes after an event, how it can be reused.” She adds, “We’re really looking at how we can be more sustainable. It’s deliberate choices on what products we can use and how we can set things up to reduce our footprint…Ideally, we are helping spread [the idea] to other events across the country.” 

Cleland adds, “We want to see horse shows and facilities adopt initiatives that are reasonably actionable in their geographic areas. There’s no ‘one size fits all’ — some municipalities simply don’t have recycling programs for show organizers to utilize, for instance. Some facilities have the means to tackle issues like erosion and water runoff that other facilities don’t. That said, recently we’ve been inspired by the horse shows like UCHS that have substantially cut their use of single-use plastics by committing to water refill stations with compostable cups. That choice alone produces exponentially less plastic waste.”

In addition to national campaigns and locally sponsored programs, an impact can be made on an individual level too. Cleland says, “Make a habit out of bringing your own refillable water bottle to horse shows and everywhere you go! Be vocal! Let your horse show organizers and venue managers know that sustainable practices are important to you.” 

As horses, trainers, and spectators show up June 6 through 12 to enjoy the 169th Upperville Colt & Horse Show, they will take part in the new green legacy of this historic event, as Cleland says, “to preserve our planet for generations of equestrians to come.” ML

This article first appeared in the June 2022 Issue.

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